Lawrence in Arabia: War, Deceit, Imperial Folly and the Making of the Modern Middle East

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Lawrence in Arabia: War, Deceit, Imperial Folly and the Making of the Modern Middle East

Lawrence in Arabia: War, Deceit, Imperial Folly and the Making of the Modern Middle East

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There was a growing Arab nationalist movement within the Arabic-speaking Ottoman territories, including many Arabs serving in the Ottoman armed forces. E. Lawrence to his Biographers, “Once There Was a Hero, Now Only His Legend Remains,” George Steiner, New York Times. The hut was removed in 1930 when Chingford Urban District Council acquired the land; it was given to the City of London Corporation which re-erected it in the grounds of The Warren, Loughton. The Man and the Motive, “Political Motivations Wrapped in a Personal Enigma,” Stanlely Weintraub, New York Times. Faisal's rule as king, however, came to an abrupt end in 1920, after the battle of Maysaloun when the French Forces of General Henri Gouraud entered Damascus under the command of General Mariano Goybet, destroying Lawrence's dream of an independent Arabia.

Lawrence's letter, in part a meditation on the glories of Chartres cathedral, is a beautiful production, privately printed for Lawrence's mother. Review: August 10, 2008, Kingmakers: the Invention of the Modern Middle East, “Meddle East,” Alex von Tunzelmann, New York Times. Revolt in the Desert was an abridged version of Seven Pillars that he began in 1926 and that was published in March 1927 in both limited and trade editions.What Faulkner offers is a very British account of the war and the Arab Revolt in the Middle East with Lawrence’s own experience of the war providing the skeletal narrative. Ultimately, all four are pushed aside by the authorities when it comes to the 'great loot', despite each of them having had a significant - if ephemeral in Prufer's case - influence on the conflict between the Ottoman Empire and the Entente. G. Hogarth as a trustee, in which he made over the copyright and any surplus income of Revolt in the Desert. E. Lawrence, including first editions, limited editions, and signed and finely bound copies of Seven Pillars of Wisdom.

In his new book, Scott Anderson expands and contextualises the familiar Lawrence story – as his title, Lawrence in Arabia, suggests. Dominus illuminatio mea, from Psalm 27, is the motto of the University of Oxford; it translates as "The Lord is my light. Works published more than 20 years after his death were protected for 50 years from publication or to 1 January 2040, whichever is earlier.He worked with Hubert Scott-Paine, the founder of the British Power Boat Company (BPBC), to introduce the 37. Lawrence describes an episode on 20 November 1917 while reconnoitring Dera'a in disguise, when he was captured by the Ottoman military, beaten, and sexually assaulted by the local bey and his guardsmen, [112] though he does not specify the nature of the sexual contact.

Having seen and admired the effective use of air power during the war, [146] Lawrence enlisted in the Royal Air Force as an aircraftman, under the name John Hume Ross in August 1922. The daring exploits of British officers are also recounted to highlight the role of individuals in influencing the campaign. He shows, for example, how the British war effort was hampered by an ill-advised contempt for Ottoman abilities – evidenced during the disastrous Gallipoli campaign when the allies landed on the very shoreline where the Turks were strongest. Having just finished reading it today, I have the feeling this has broadened my horizons beyond Lawrence in Arabia and I am sure I will be reading more about the imperial folly side of things in the near future. He hated bureaucratic work, writing on 21 May 1921 to Robert Graves: "I wish I hadn't gone out there: the Arabs are like a page I have turned over; and sequels are rotten things.He campaigned for his and Churchill's vision of the Middle East, publishing pieces in multiple newspapers, including The Times, The Observer, The Daily Mail, and The Daily Express. In 1896, the Lawrences moved to Oxford, where Thomas attended the High School and then studied history at Jesus College, Oxford, from 1907 to 1910. This underplays the drastic geopolitical shifts in the Middle East and the devastation caused by the First World War.



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