Coffee with Hitler: The British Amateurs Who Tried to Civilise the Nazis

£10
FREE Shipping

Coffee with Hitler: The British Amateurs Who Tried to Civilise the Nazis

Coffee with Hitler: The British Amateurs Who Tried to Civilise the Nazis

RRP: £20.00
Price: £10
£10 FREE Shipping

In stock

We accept the following payment methods

Description

Darren O'Byrne, History Today 'This compelling book captures the double-edged nature of "one mainstay of British values" - giving "even the most blatantly disgusting people the benefit of the doubt. The process starts in June 1934 with efforts continuing right-up to the outbreak of the second world war in September 1939; with the addition of a further crucial commentary on the period from September 1939 through to May 1941. One, this is a segment of a much larger story and there are elements about which we still know little and, perhaps, that will always be the case about such a controversial area of British History. Coffee with Hitler tells the astounding and poignant story, for the first time, of a handful of amateur British intelligence agents who wined, dined and befriended the leading National Socialists between the wars.

They consisted of “a leftwing, pacifist Welsh political secretary, a conservative, butterfly-collecting Old Etonian businessman and a pioneering Great War fighter ace”.Andrew Roberts, author of Churchill: Walking with Destiny 'Charles Spicer tells the chilling story of how otherwise respectable men and women became pawns in a game of international intrigue with a reprehensible regime. All this naturally supports the view of unsatisfactory outcome of the Treaty of Versailles and the effect on German social and economic state that ultimately led to the rise of the Nazis and the creation of the Third Reich. The second point is that the notes to the book are totally inadequate whether this is the author's fault or the publisher wishing to save space is not clear.

The last two paragraphs of the book beautifully summarise the lessons we need to learn to navigate our current and future relationships with dictators and autocracies. We don’t share your credit card details with third-party sellers, and we don’t sell your information to others. A truly illuminating, humane and sophisticated book - and, one hopes, the first of many by an exciting new talent on the historical scene. History has overlooked the three amateurs who, despite their heroic efforts and best intentions, could not stop the descent into hell of the National Socialists. Spicer describes his intentions in writing Coffee With Hitler as being explicitly about those who sought to “civilise” rather than “appease” the Nazis.In this refreshingly objective book, Spicer profiles the Anglo-German Fellowship, a 1930s British collective which tried to “civilise the Nazis” – some from naivety, others out of ruthless pragmatism.

Tension builds as the three Germanophile's close friendships with the top echelons of the Nazi leadership get further and further strained as war approaches. Instead, it lay somewhere between disinterest, snobbish, if inaccurate, contempt (“the man’s a house painter! Spicer’s book is a resounding success, retelling the fascinating history of the Anglo-German Fellowship.Both appeasers and civilisers overrated their own abilities and underestimated the evils to which they – largely unwittingly – played handmaiden. Washington Post 'In this terrific debut, historian Charles Spicer genuinely enriches and deepens our understanding of the Thirties - the all-important decade in which the great and the good of these islands, scarred to the depths of their souls by the Great War, struggled to avoid a second global conflict. Kirkus, starred review 'As a lesson of history, this excellent book is a sober reminder to policymakers to look at the evidence in plain sight.

Rothermere’s Daily Mail published articles praising Hitler and editorials declaring “Hurrah for the Blackshirts!and, in some circles, quiet satisfaction that a vigorous reformer had shaken up his country in an apparently effective and forward-looking fashion. In this terrific debut, historian Charles Spicer genuinely enriches and deepens our understanding of the Thirties – the all-important decade in which the great and the good of these islands, scarred to the depths of their souls by the Great War, struggled to avoid a second global conflict. Charles Spicer has achieved something rare, a book that is entertaining and informative whilst also being an important piece of scholarship.



  • Fruugo ID: 258392218-563234582
  • EAN: 764486781913
  • Sold by: Fruugo

Delivery & Returns

Fruugo

Address: UK
All products: Visit Fruugo Shop